Bleating Tree Frog

Litoria dentata

Pronunciation: Lit-tor-re-ah, dent-tah-tah

Litoria dentata PROFILE PIC - GNN EDIT

Identification

The Bleating Tree Frog is a small frog at about 40 – 44  mm SVL, and can be a light cream colour to darker colours, with breeding males becoming a yellow to lime yellow.

The Bleating Tree Frog is a tree frog (in the Hylidae family) and thus can climb. If the frog is brown and can climb, there are a few possibilities in the Sutherland Shire region (See Below).

1. The longitudinal band down the back is the main identifying feature of the Bleating Tree Frog.

COMING SOON

2. If the frog has crossed shaped pupils it can be readily distinguished as a Perons Tree Frog.

A rare observation of a male Bleating Tree Frog (top) trying to mate with a female Perons Tree Frog (Bottom). This is a good photo for comparing these two tree frogs for ID purposes.

A rare observation of a male Bleating Tree Frog (top) trying to mate with a female Perons Tree Frog (Bottom). This is a good photo for comparing these two tree frogs for ID purposes.

 

3. If the frog has a band/stripe down its back and has small toe discs, with red inner thighs, it can be distinguished as a Whistling Tree Frog. These frogs sometimes have blotched patterns on the dorsum. 

Small toe suction disks of the Whistling Tree Frog. This frog is mainly terrestrial and does not climb often, hence it does not need large toe disks | Copyright Chad Beranek 2016

Small toe suction disks of the Whistling Tree Frog. This frog is mainly terrestrial and does not climb often, hence it does not need large toe disks | Copyright Chad Beranek 2016

Orange inner thighs of the Whistling Tree Frog | Copyright Chad Beranek 2015

Orange inner thighs of the Whistling Tree Frog | Copyright Chad Beranek 2015

 

 

Distribution within Sutherland Shire region

Alfords Point – Unconfirmed

Bangor – Unconfirmed

Bonnet Bay – Unconfirmed

Bundeena – Uncommon

Caringbah – Rare

Engadine – Uncommon

Heathcote – Uncomfirmed

Holsworthy – Uncomfirmed

Illawong – Uncomfirmed

Kareela – RareKurnell – Uncommon

Lucas Heights – Unconfirmed

Maianbar – Unconfirmed

Menai – Unconfirmed

Royal National Park – Uncommon

Waterfall – Uncommon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This section will be updated as new data comes in. If there you have encountered this frog in a Sutherland Shire suburb which is not on this list, or is “unconfirmed” , please email gumnutmail@gmail.com with a photo of the frog and the suburb it was found in, or contact us. This is greatly appreciated as this extra data can help get a better idea of frog distributions around Sutherland Shire.

 

How to attract them to your backyard

Retain native canopy coverage: Bleating Tree Frogs appear to overwinter within the canopy and are known shelter in tree hollows and bark exfoliations, as well as tree epiphytes such as Asplenium australasicum and Platycerium bifurcatum.

Shrubs adjacent to pond: Bleating Tree Frogs  also appear to call from elevated situations next to ponds such as shrubs. Ensuring there are shrubs adjacent to ponds in your garden will give males a spot to call from and encourage breeding.

Warm water temperature; less shade: The Bleating Tree Frog primarily breeds in the warmest months of the year and requires warm water temperatures for tadpole development. Therefore you should ensure ponds get a lot of sun. Ensure the pond is not located right next to a fence or other structures which block sunlight. It is also advised to keep thick vegetation to the south of the pond so that the vegetation does not obstruct sunlight. It is okay if the pond is in such a sunny position that it dries up. Bleating Tree Frogs appear to favour ponds which have a tendency to dry up (ephemeral).

 

Native plants to consider:

Canopy

Epiphytes

 

Return to species list

 

 

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