Banksias: The no. 1 plant for attracting wildlife

I have a Coastal Banksia (Banksia integrefolia) in my backyard and it has attracting some awesome bird species to my garden over the years. Just a month ago I was surprised to find a female Bowerbird stopping over in this tree. While I don’t think it was feeding off it, it certainly used the wiry branches of the Banksia as protection from aggressive birds such as minas. Its remarkable as the nearest bush is still a few blocks away. Another avian highlight was a few years ago when I discovered a Scaly-breasted Lorrikeet pair feeding off the Banksia pollen. At the stage I was quite new to birds and was confused as to why a Rainbow Lorikeet was all green. I took photos and later discovered to my amazement that we had just had a pair of the rarer Scaly-breasted Lorikeets visiting.

Scaley-breasted Lorikeet (Trichoglossus chlorolepidopus) feeding off my backyard Banksia | Copyright Chad Beraneki 2013)

Scaley-breasted Lorikeet (Trichoglossus chlorolepidopus) feeding off my backyard Banksia | Copyright Chad Beraneki 2013)

Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haemotodus) feeding off the same Banksia | Copright Chad Beranek 2016

Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haemotodus) feeding off the same Banksia | Copright Chad Beranek 2016

While the obvious candidates to be attracted to Banksias are animals that feed off the nectar and use the plant for protection, there are even more potential species which can be attracted by these plants. The other night I was marveling and some of the ‘flow-on’ attracting powers it has. And what I mean by flow-on is how attracting one animal species might attract another. We have had lots of Grey-headed Flying Foxes visiting lately which have been enjoying the last remains of the Banksia nectar for this season. Their presence attracted a very large and menacing backyard resident which has not been recorded in my garden yet…

An adorable Grey-headed Flying Fox (Pteropus poliocephalus) having a Banksia pollen feed | Copyright Chad Beranek 2016

An adorable Grey-headed Flying Fox (Pteropus poliocephalus) having a Banksia pollen feed | Copyright Chad Beranek 2016


The resident they attracted was the local Powerful Owl who has a few roosting sites and nesting hollows scattered around Sutherland Shire (sometimes you can catch them at Camelia Gardens). I was actually coming home late from a party that night and heard the flying foxes make their usual playful chatter among the foliage of our Banksia. But then I caught a glance of the silhouette of a large bird sitting on my neighbors aerial. Straight away I knew that the only bird it could be is a Powerful Owl, due to the size. I stayed up late observing him eyeing off the flying foxes, waiting for them to make one wrong move. Fortunately they didn’t cross paths with the owl and didn’t seem to even notice it.

Powerful Owl (Ninox strenua) sitting on my neighbours aerial eyeing off flying foxes | Copyright Chad Beranek 2016

Powerful Owl (Ninox strenua) sitting on my neighbours aerial eyeing off flying foxes | Copyright Chad Beranek 2016

This is just one example of some flow-on attracting powers the Banksia has. There are plenty more animals that can potentially be attracting by this plant which cover all animal groups. Some old school naturalists back in the day have stated that Perons Tree Frogs will sleep in the bark and small hollows of Banksia so they are even good for attracting local hylid tree frogs. The amount of animals that will be attracted to Banksias increases ten-fold if you are close to bushland, with rather critters likely to make an appearance, including Pigmy Possums, Feathertailed Gliders, Antechinus, Sugar Gliders and countless nectar feeding birds. You might get lucky and attract some really rare nectar feeding birds.

Brush-tailed Possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) climbing the nearby Paperbark after having a Banksia feed | Copyright Chad Beranek 2016

Brush-tailed Possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) climbing the nearby Paperbark after having a Banksia feed | Copyright Chad Beranek 2016

 

 

Comment below if you have a Banksia in the backyard and have noticed any Australian animals using the Banksia for food or habitat!